Founder Liverymen

  • John Barber. DL
  • Graham Barker
  • Dr Gary Bell
  • John Benjamin
  • Geoffrey Bond OBE
  • Mark Bridge
  • The Rt Hon The Lord Brooke of Sutton Mandville. CH
  • Marie-Francoise Bryan
  • Patricia Burgin
  • Roddy Caxton-Spencer
  • Deborah Charles
  • Tom Christopherson
  • David Constable
  • Alan S.Cook
  • Mark Dalrymple
  • Alastair Dickenson
  • Tara Draper-Stumm
  • Philippa Granville
  • Dr Loyd Grossman OBE
  • John Hudson
  • Prof Paul Jarrett
  • Miriam Kramer
  • David Lavender
  • Alastair Leslie
  • Elizabeth Mellows
  • Christina Munday
  • David Needham
  • Toby Parker
  • Molly Rumbelow
  • Guy Schooling
  • Colin Sewell-Rutter
  • Nicholas Somers
  • John Spanner
  • Clive Stewart-Lockhart
  • Carolyn Stoddart-Scott
  • Eleanor Thompson
  • Paul Viney
Close Me

The Crest – a “brock” (badger) holding a golden horn (Or) – a reference to the Company’s two founders, Lord Peter Brooke and Jonathan Horne.

The Shield – Gules (red) – signifying magnanimity – an allusion to the Company’s charity work – set with a depiction of the Horne Cup, the special silver goblet commissioned by the then Master, Philippa Glanville and the Court in memory of Jonathan. Behind the goblet are two crossed Roman spears – an allusion to the time when Roman soldiers advertised an auction of their chattels by sticking a spear in the ground – the Roman spears and the cup together is an allusion to Arts Scholars dealing with items from ancient to modern times.

The Latin motto – ARTES IN URBE COLAMUS – translates as “We foster Arts (with)in the City” and was devised by the late Geoff Egan FSA, a Past Master.

The Supporters - a squirrel and a dragon, symbolise two different aspects of the guardianship of the treasures of the past. The squirrel (who holds a golden acorn) is representative of the careful acquisitiveness of the collector. The dragon (a symbol of the City of London) cradles a pot of excavated Roman gold. Dragons are traditionally seen as fierce and vigilant guardians of treasure.

The Worshipful Company of Arts Scholars

 

The Worshipful Company of Arts Scholars is a Livery Company in the City of London.

Membership is open to those engaged in the study, curation, collection and trade in antiques, antiquities and objects of decorative and applied art. It also welcomes those engaged in the many associated support businesses such as restoration and conservation, insurance, event organisation, tax and legal advice, packing and shipping.

The Company is unique in bringing together such a range and depth of knowledge and expertise. The membership is united in a shared enjoyment of the past and a desire to encourage appreciation and knowledge of the decorative arts, now and in the future. As a result, meetings are not only convivial but always provoke a lively and productive exchange of views.

It is the Company’s aim to sustain and enhance the standing of those employed in this sector by recognising past achievements and by fostering future excellence through scholarship.

These ends are furthered by the Company’s charitable funds which provide a number of educational awards as well as supporting publications, exhibitions and other projects.

The Company takes a wide view of the role of the decorative arts in the community, encouraging diversity and good citizenship.

The Company was recognised as a Company without Livery in 2010.

The Company attained Livery status on the 11th February 2014 and became the 110th Livery Company in The City of London

 

The Company has taken as its emblem this marble head of Mithras of about 180-220 AD. It was discovered during the excavation of the late Roman temple of Mithras just off Queen Victoria Street after the Second World War and is now in the Museum of London.

Mithras was a complex cult figure embodying light, truth and regeneration.

To the Company of Art Scholars this emblem represents the history which lies everywhere beneath the surface of the City of London.